Up Your Cupcake
Please 'Register' or 'Log-in' to start interacting with the forum.

Up Your Cupcake

Connect with other women from all over the world! Share advice, get support, & make lifelong friendships.
 
HomePortalRegisterLog in
Log in
Username:
Password:
Log in automatically: 
:: I forgot my password
Navigation
Portal
Forum
Memberlist
User Control Panel
Forum FAQ

December 2017
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
CalendarCalendar
Tweet With Us ♥
Poll
What is your opinion on Male Infant Circumcision?
 Pro-Circumcision
 Pro-Parents Choice
 Anti-Circumcision
 I don't have an opinion.
View results

Share | .
 

 How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
avatar
SnarkyCupcake
Administrator
Administrator


PostSubject: How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up   Fri Sep 05, 2014 7:56 am

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] wrote:
Carl Zimmer [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] | Sept 4 2014

Every second, people around the world drink more than 26,000 cups of coffee. And while some of them may care only about the taste, most use it as a way to deliver caffeine into their bloodstream. Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world.

Many of us get our caffeine fix in tea, and still others drink mate, brewed from the South American yerba mate plant. Cacao plants produce caffeine, too, meaning that you can get a mild dose from eating chocolate.

Caffeine may be a drug, but it’s not the product of some underworld chemistry lab; rather, it’s the result of millions of years of plant evolution. Despite our huge appetite for caffeine, however, scientists know little about how and why plants make it.

A new study is helping to change that. An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of Coffea canephora, one of the main sources of coffee beans. By analyzing its genes, the scientists were able to reconstruct [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].

The new study, published Thursday in the journal Science, sheds light on how plants evolved to make caffeine as a way to control the behavior of animals—and, indirectly, us.

Caffeine starts out in coffee plants as a precursor compound called xanthosine. The coffee plant makes an enzyme that chops off a dangling arm of atoms from the xanthosine; a second enzyme adds a cluster of atoms at another spot. The plant then uses two additional enzymes to add two additional clusters. Once the process is complete, they’ve turned xanthosine into caffeine.

The process may seem extraordinarily complex, but the new coffee genome study offers a detailed look at how it evolved.

The caffeine-building enzymes belong to a group of enzymes called N-methyltransferases. They’re found in all plants, and they build a variety of compounds. Many of these molecules serve as weapons against enemies of the plants. Sometimes, those weapons turn out to be valuable to us. Salicylic acid, first discovered in willow trees, became the basis for aspirin, for example.

The evolution of caffeine in coffee started when the gene for an N-methyltransferase mutated, changing how the enzyme behaved. Later, the plants accidentally duplicated the mutated gene, creating new copies. Those copies then mutated into still other forms.

“They’re all descendants of a common ancestor enzyme that started screwing around with xanthosine compounds,” said Victor A. Albert, an evolutionary biologist at the University at Buffalo and co-author of the new study.

Scientists had already determined that caffeine was also made in other plants, like tea and cacao, by N-methyltransferases. But by sequencing the coffee genome, Dr. Albert and his colleagues were able to make a more detailed comparison of the genes in different species. They discovered that in cacao, the enzymes manufacturing caffeine did not evolve from the same ancestors as those in coffee.

In other words, the coffee plant and cacao plant took different evolutionary paths to reach the same destination. Evolutionary biologists call this sort of process convergent evolution.

Birds, for example, evolved wings when their finger bones fused together and sprouted feathers more than 150 million years ago. Bats, on the other hand, evolved wings about 60 million years ago when their fingers stretched out and became covered in membranes.

When convergent evolution produces the same complex trait more than once, it’s usually a sign of a powerfully useful adaptation. Experiments with coffee plants offer some clues as to why evolution would reinvent caffeine so often…
[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
Back to top Go down
avatar
epiod
Administrator
Administrator


PostSubject: Re: How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up   Fri Sep 05, 2014 11:26 am

LOVE THIS
Back to top Go down
avatar
Bethers
VIP
VIP


PostSubject: Re: How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up   Sat Sep 06, 2014 5:43 pm

That's pretty interesting. I'll have to share this with Alanna.
Back to top Go down
avatar
prdlatinamami
Blogger
Blogger


PostSubject: Re: How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up   Sun Sep 07, 2014 12:13 pm

Very interesting! Thanks for sharing!
Back to top Go down

Sponsored content



PostSubject: Re: How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up   

Back to top Go down
 

How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up

View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Up Your Cupcake :: HOT TOPICS & E-DISCUSSIONS ♥ :: News & Views-